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  #1  
Old 03-23-2017, 01:02 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Finally handled an Inland today

A LGS got in an Inland 1911A1. The front sight was on crooked, the rear of the slide and frame were not flush, the trigger was real heavy, and the frame was just like an older Auto Ordnance with the slide stop overhanging the bottom edge of the frame and a blocky, squared-off front strap (there's no doubt in my mind the two companies share the same parts suppliers). All for $800. I was hoping they were going to do a better job than that, especially when the picture of the original factory prototype looked so nice. At this point I'm still going to suggest the AO instead because it sells for less. If Inland is going to charge more money for theirs they should do a better job with the fitting and assembly.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1946 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #2  
Old 03-23-2017, 09:52 AM
Killerangel Killerangel is offline
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Wow

Makes the CZ 1911A1's that I grabbed a couple or so of seem like a steal at between $695-$745.00. Lots of decent guns out there for $800 and less with no flaws! Makes you wonder what some companies are thinking when entering a very competitive market with poor quality control.
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  #3  
Old 03-23-2017, 12:42 PM
old doc old doc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killerangel View Post
Makes the CZ 1911A1's that I grabbed a couple or so of seem like a steal at between $695-$745.00. Lots of decent guns out there for $800 and less with no flaws! Makes you wonder what some companies are thinking when entering a very competitive market with poor quality control.
No comparison between an Inland or AO and a CZ 1911-A1 made by Dan Wesson . If you want to know what a good deal your CZ was, look at the new DW A2 model. Same gun as your CZ only with combat sights and lists over $1600 .
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  #4  
Old 03-23-2017, 03:14 PM
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Even a Colt 1991 is less than $800 now, and it'll eat the Inland for lunch and spit the bones out.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1946 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #5  
Old 04-06-2017, 05:50 PM
Captain H Captain H is online now
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My Inland exhibited none of the issues you witnessed. I have only seen the one I own, but if they are AO parts, I could see it. My experience with AO is that they use a couple of different frames in their 1911's, some exhibit the things you pointed out on the Inland. This is why I would not buy one that I could not inspect personally before purchase. It is a shame that the Inland you handled had these issues. I was hoping that, due to their higher prices than AO, they would have a more solid QC.
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  #6  
Old 04-15-2017, 11:24 AM
azqkr azqkr is offline
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Here's what my gunsmith noted on my AO parked milspec [ Kahr ] when he replaced ignition parts to Harrison for me.
__________________________________________________ _____________________

OK, y'all; here's what I found in working on Brownie's AO 1911 A1 today.

First, I was shocked at the minimal amount of MIM parts I found in the gun. In short; the hammer. If there were more, they were final finished such that I couldn't find any of their normal "sprue like" identifiers. As most of you know, MIM parts are usually popped out of the mold and used as is; so I really think a decision was made by the manufacturer to use some good quality parts in this pistol.

The quality and fit of the internals was surprising. Barrel fit to bushing and slide, both barrel hood and lugs, was better than many more expensive 1911's I've had on my bench over the years. Lockup of the barrel at both ends is very tight. No end play, side play or barrel springing at the hood at all.

The two series 80 levers, like most, did benefit from polishing on one side. That said, both the plunger and hole in the slide were polished nicely, and the system was timed very well, with no peening of the firing pin evident.

The extractor, while tension was set too heavy, was otherwise fit very well. There is no clocking, and the bottom edge of the extractor groove behind the claw had been perfectly radiused and was highly polished; more evidence of hand fitting by someone who takes pride in their work.

Both the frame ramp and break over angle (often referred to as the "barrel ramp" by many) were well done, and highly polished.

The back side of the slide stop was a bit rough, as were the edges. These days, that's more often found than not, and a bit of judicious stoning ensured that any futher wear of the frame was at an end.

Stoning the trigger bow tracks in the frame was next, working through 220, 320, 400, and 600 grit stones.

Moving on to the upgrades; the new sear, disconnector, and hammer fit very well, though a bit of fitting between the new hammer strut, strut pin and hammer were needed to get things sorted out.

As happens more often than not; the installation of the new ignition set required that the original thumb safety be refitted to the new parts.

Next, the new short trigger had to be fitted, as the trigger pad is left over size, so it can be fitted to the pistol with no top, bottom or sideplay.

After all was complete, an average of eight trigger pulls provided a pull weight five pounds even, with no creep, grit and minimum overtravel. It also provided a very nice reset; so we decided that no adjustments to the sear or disconnector legs of the sear spring were necessary.

Over the next few days, I'll function test the pistol with a variety of 200gr LSWC, 230gr LRN, 230gr ball, 230gr JHP, 230gr JTCHP, and and even some of the old Speer "flying ashtrays." A variety of magazines will be used; including Mecgar, Colt, CheckMate and Wilson 47d eight round mags.

When the pistol makes it through all that with NO malfunctions; I'll return it to our "little old snake oil salesman" at our early April class for his daily carry.

This pistol is a real "sleeper," and I intend to buy one myself in the near future; it really is "that good."
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  #7  
Old 04-15-2017, 01:15 PM
picketpin picketpin is offline
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Not to detract from the origional post but since the Inland is being compared directly to the AO I have a few comments. AO continues to get hammered for its history, admitted the stories are quite bad from the Numrich Arms Years. I purchased this one in 2015, it exhibits none of the things that people complain about with the possible exception of the shape of the ears on either side of the grip safety. Shoots really well and has functioned near 100% since new without any tuning and fired only with my reloads. I have been completely happy with this one since purchasing and I'm very particular about how my pistols run, and how this one looked. It was, and possibly still is the most accurate reproduction of the 1911 A1 available, and I would add at quite a reasonable price. Its a shame if the inlands and AO's have gone backwards like the OP states...



Last edited by picketpin; 04-15-2017 at 01:32 PM.
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  #8  
Old 04-15-2017, 03:45 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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^Yours has the rounded, Colt-like front strap on the frame and no overhang of the slide stop. I thought the Inlands were using these improved frames as well, but the one I looked at has the same squared-off, thick front strap of older AO guns and the overhanging slide stop. That must mean there are a couple of suppliers for the frames and one does a better job than the other.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1946 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #9  
Old 06-19-2017, 12:53 AM
peacebutready peacebutready is offline
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Originally Posted by old doc View Post
No comparison between an Inland or AO and a CZ 1911-A1 made by Dan Wesson . If you want to know what a good deal your CZ was, look at the new DW A2 model. Same gun as your CZ only with combat sights and lists over $1600 .
The CZ was manufactured with the same care as the $1600 DW? BTW, I think the DW 1911A1 goes for $1250 or so. I think I saw one for less.


Quote:
Originally Posted by azqkr View Post
Here's what my gunsmith noted on my AO parked milspec [ Kahr ] when he replaced ignition parts to Harrison for me.

OK, y'all; here's what I found in working on Brownie's AO 1911 A1 today.

The quality and fit of the internals was surprising. Barrel fit to bushing and slide, both barrel hood and lugs, was better than many more expensive 1911's I've had on my bench over the years. Lockup of the barrel at both ends is very tight. No end play, side play or barrel springing at the hood at all.

That said, both the plunger and hole in the slide were polished nicely, and the system was timed very well, with no peening of the firing pin evident.

Both the frame ramp and break over angle (often referred to as the "barrel ramp" by many) were well done, and highly polished.

This pistol is a real "sleeper," and I intend to buy one myself in the near future; it really is "that good."
This isn't the first time I read something like this for the AO. Seems like a good model to replace ignition parts with.

Know what year it was made by any chance?

What does it typically cost in both parts and labor to have that kind of work done to a 1911 by a skilled 'smith?

Last edited by peacebutready; 06-19-2017 at 12:55 AM. Reason: Add something
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  #10  
Old 06-20-2017, 03:03 PM
Dark Horse Dark Horse is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by picketpin View Post
Not to detract from the origional post but since the Inland is being compared directly to the AO I have a few comments. AO continues to get hammered for its history, admitted the stories are quite bad from the Numrich Arms Years. I purchased this one in 2015, it exhibits none of the things that people complain about with the possible exception of the shape of the ears on either side of the grip safety. Shoots really well and has functioned near 100% since new without any tuning and fired only with my reloads. I have been completely happy with this one since purchasing and I'm very particular about how my pistols run, and how this one looked. It was, and possibly still is the most accurate reproduction of the 1911 A1 available, and I would add at quite a reasonable price. Its a shame if the inlands and AO's have gone backwards like the OP states...


I also picked up an AO back in early 2014. I bought it because I wanted a plain GI 1911. I had good luck with a Kahr I recently gave to my brother and he has 5 or 6 Kahr's and loves them all, so I figured it would be worth giving AO a try.
I'm glad I did because mine too has been an exceptionally good surprise.
I don't want to offend anyone, but the one I have is better than the last Springfield Mil-spec I owned.
Better machining and a much better parker finish.
I wish it was a 70 series, but I can live with it (afterall my Colt Combat Commander XSE has the same firing pin block/plunger in it).
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  #11  
Old 06-21-2017, 05:31 AM
peacebutready peacebutready is offline
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Originally Posted by Dark Horse View Post
I also picked up an AO back in early 2014. I bought it because I wanted a plain GI 1911.

I don't want to offend anyone, but the one I have is better than the last Springfield Mil-spec I owned.
Better machining and a much better parker finish.

About when was the Springfield made? Was it a Mil-Spec made here or the other GI model made in Brazil?
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  #12  
Old 06-22-2017, 04:27 AM
Dark Horse Dark Horse is online now
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It was an Imbel (Brazilian).
I must admit I never much cared for any of the Brazilian Springfield's.
IMO, they were very much hit and miss quality wize. My bad for purchasing it in the first place. I wound up putting a lot of time and work into it just to make it acceptible to me....then gave it away to a friend.
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  #13  
Old 06-22-2017, 04:45 AM
peacebutready peacebutready is offline
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Originally Posted by peacebutready View Post
About when was the Springfield made? Was it a Mil-Spec made here or the other GI model made in Brazil?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse View Post
It was an Imbel (Brazilian).
I must admit I never much cared for any of the Brazilian Springfield's.
IMO, they were very much hit and miss quality wize. My bad for purchasing it in the first place. I wound up putting a lot of time and work into it just to make it acceptible to me....then gave it away to a friend.

The latest ones made here are better. I'm also pretty sure they're better than the AO models.
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  #14  
Old 06-22-2017, 06:03 AM
boatdoc boatdoc is offline
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saw and playe d with an inland a few months back--PASS
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